My work is informed by a life steeped in culture. But to unpack it you need to look beyond the assumed academic trajectory of "insider art." It is, rather, informed by the traditional and tourist art brought home by my mother, an award winning commercial travel photographer (a work by Joseph Cornell using one of her images is held in the Smithsonian American Art Museum), my travels with her, and her own saturated vision of the world. It is equally informed by the polish and style of the exquisite black and white prints of my father, one-time photo assistant to fashion photographer William Helburn. 
Not less, my work is informed by the embarrassment of cultural riches of my home town, New York City. Growing up, subway graffiti, street fair imports, Punk DIY fashion, Keith Haring's subway murals, and a healthy alternative scene seethed around more traditional galleries and world class museums. The latter, rather than narrowing my scope, broadened it. Nested beside the more obvious vocabulary of AbEx, old masters, decorative arts, and design, look for the philosophies behind the Japanese practice of kintsugi, beautifully mending the broken and honoring the life of an object, the deliberate imperfections built into of the arts of the Islamic world in humility before God, and, likely influenced by many mornings as a schoolgirl silently contemplating the austere elegance of the 1861 Quaker meeting house at Friends, the Shaker pursuit of excellence in the craftsmanship of utilitarian objects with humble materials.
Using that lexicon I explore the issues of my day to day experiences, both personal and as a part of a larger society. And whether channeling the full-throttle exuberance of a NYC street or the reductive tranquility of a quiet interior, I strive to produce the best, the most perfect, beautiful object I can, not in service to God, but humanity, and I find authenticity, humility, and beauty in the flaw, and the life—but never without trying to make something as lovely, as enriching, as giving to the world as I can make it to be. 
My CV is equally informed by life. At twenty-three, during my last semester at the School of Visual Arts, I was smooshed by a taxi and lost the use of my right hand. Starting with the academic coursework and with the help of the adaptive devices my father made for me for the studio, I muddled through between multiple surgeries to finish my BA two years later. My professor Jack Whitten, liking my early efforts in more loosely painted installations, curated me into a senior show. I made an obligatory stab at the galleries but not producing work up to my own standard, soon stopped. Regrouping, I took a deep breath, an enormous student loan, and went for a Master's in Arts Administration at Columbia University. I took a studio credit while finishing my thesis. The years using my left hand had won me control and I was painting again, and I felt, painting well. 
Not long after, Jerry Saltz announced he would give critiques at X-Initiative's BYOA. I decided to go for it. I would not need to explain the giant hole in my CV, my work could speak for itself. When my turn came Jerry engaged the group with observations about how I was doing everything you weren't 'supposed to do,' like using a decorative vocabulary, and making it work. He decreed, “You’re going to make it as a painter.” Objective validation, by someone with legitimate credentials. It gave me courage to engage with the art world again. I made some headway. 
In 2016, paralleling my old joke that every painter needs a wife, I was conscripted by the onset and progression of my mother's dementia into the role of caretaker. Whatever scraps of time I found for my own pursuits I used to make art, career-management a distant consideration. 
I have another hole in my CV, but I am a master of my craft and for those who can let the experience of navigating a work inform them, I won’t need one.
Solo and Feature Shows

2016 | Prepositional Painting, solo, Chashama 300, NYC – Awarded NEA Grant
2014 | Venn, solo, Tompkins Square, NYPL, NYC – Artcritical Pick
2013 | Source, Bernard Klevickas & CJ Nye, The Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery and Performance Space, Bay Shore, NY
2011 | Eponymous solo, The George Bruce, NYPL, NYC
2010 | Shave & a Diptych - Two Bits, solo, Barber Bart, NYC
2001 | Eponymous solo, Earth 2 Mars, NYC

Select Group Shows

2017 | In*Formation : Women in Reflection, c: Ann Smith, Hatch Gallery, Hamtramck, MI
2016 | Sideshow Nation: Thru the Looking Glass, Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY
2015 | A Weekend at the Old Gem, presented by Arts@Renaissance with support from the NYC DCA, Brooklyn, NY
2014 | Cavellini Festival, c: Mark Bloch, White Box, NYC
2014 | Content in Absence, Montclair Art Museum's Young Curators Program, Pierro Art Gallery, South Orange, NJ
2014 | Those Little Things, Montclair Art Museum's Young Curators Program, Pierro Art Gallery, South Orange, NJ
2012 | It’s a Small, Small, World, c: Jayson Musson, Family Business, NYC
2010 | B.Y.O.A., X Initiative, NYC
2000 | Plural Dimensions, c: Jack Whitten, SVA Gallery Soho, NYC

Select Plates, Reviews, and Interviews

2015 | The Perch, Yale University, Volume 3, p. 85
2014 | Owen Wister Review, pp. 146 & 198
2013 | Calyx, Volume 27, No. 3, pp. 38-40, 124 & Cover
2013 | The Thing About Drawing, Praeterita, Philip A Hartigan
2013 | CJ Nye, Independent Artist, Artist Chat, ArtBookGuy 
2012 | Art Word: CJ Nye, Cincinnati Art Snob

Select Projects and Events

2016 | THoF IV image onboard OSIRIR-REx, 2021-2023 unmanned mission to Bennu asteroid, NASA
2015 | Moon Drawing #04802, The Moon Drawings project, Carnegie Mellon University
2014 | Bob and Roberta Smith Art Amnesty, MoMA PS1, Queens, NY
2013 | Selected for Curate NYC online exhibition by guest curator Debra Simon
2013 | Selected for Curate NYC online exhibition by guest curator Amanda Hunt
2011 | Artists and the Economy, Postcard Protest to the White House (initiated), President Obama responded 

Education

2007 | Columbia University, MA Arts Administration
2000 | School of Visual Arts, BA Fine Art